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Edward Farrell A Magnificent Regency Tea Kettle on Stand

Silver
London, 1817
Maker’s mark of Edward Farrell

Height: 33.5 cm, 13.18 in.
Weight: 2420 gr., 77 oz. 16 dwt.
 

Video Silversmith Biography

Farrell's apprenticeship or freedom are unrecorded, and his early life is relatively unknown. Holden's Triennial Directory of 1805-7 described him as a silversmith, but his first mark was not registered until 1813. The most productive period of Farrell's career coincided with his association with the entrepreneur, silversmith, and jeweller Kensington Lewis, whose most important patron was Frederick, Duke of York. Lewis was supplied with extravagant sculptural plate in a variety of revival styles by Farrell, drawing principally on seventeenth-century Flemish, German and Italian designs in high relief. Lewis' business was unable to recover from the death of the Duke of York in 1827, and Farrell no longer had the opportunity to make the plate on such a grand scale. Thereafter, he was best known for highly embossed tea services chased with decoration derived from seventeenth-century Dutch genre painting.

Description

Of spherical form and magnificently decorated in high relief, with cast and applied details depicting scenes of merrymaking peasants, in the manner of Teniers; amidst the revelling, a fox runs off with a goose in its jaws. A similarly ornate swing handle surmounts with cast and applied leaves, finished with canework. The hinged cover applied with the small figure of a monkey sitting beside an exotic selection of fruits, the double curve spout cast with a Bacchanalian mask. The openwork stand with spirit burner is well modelled with cast decoration, in which features a small dragon and bees surrounded by festoons of fruiting vines; the stand supported by triple S-curve legs to leaf pad feet.

Both the kettle and its stand engraved ‘hXX 2’

 

A Magnificent Regency Tea Kettle on Stand Reference: 23856/2